Exeter City Supporters Trust

Following our meeting with Dave Adcock from Exeter City Council, we decided to explore a new partnership to test how users would engage with the Time Trail app in the context of sport. Partly inspired by the sight of children playing football in my daughter’s school, we decided that Exeter City Supporters Trust would be an interesting option, as so much of the history of Exeter is linked to the history of the club and the trust.

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Tom Cadbury contacted Lewis Jones, with whom he was in touch about another project, and who has been a Trustee, to see if the Exeter City Supporters Trust would be interested in testing the app to design heritage trails to do with sport. Lewis secured the support of the trust for this initial stage of work, which inspired us all to think more creatively about what the app could/should do in this context. We subsequently met Lewis, who provided us with a wealth of stories and materials that will allow us to design a few trails by June.

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We immediately realised, from what he was telling us, that the stadium itself, St James’ Park, represented a brilliant starting point, and that trails could be designed that would link the stadium to heritage sites,  schools, and even pubs. We immediately felt that the app would allow fans to add their memories to trails generated by us and the Trust, and that these could be used educationally in schools as well as at St James’ Park itself. So, for instance, Lewis talked at length about the work of Jamie Vittles and the Football in the Community initiative that we would love to collaborate with.

The next step is for all of us to read up on all the literature we borrowed from Lewis, and I am starting with Grecian Voices, not the DVD in the image below, which Will took for the weekend, but the book by Dave Fisher and Gerald Gosling. Once we are more familiar with the texts, we can attempt to create a few trails for our next meeting in June at St James’ Park.

If you are a football fan, and you are interested in learning more about this project, feel free to contact us.

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About Gabriella Giannachi

Gabriella Giannachi is Professor in Performance and New Media, and Director of the Centre for Intermedia at the University of Exeter, which promotes advanced interdisciplinary research in performance and the arts through collaborations between artists, academics and scientists from a range of disciplines. Her most recent and forthcoming book publications include: Virtual Theatres: an Introduction (Routledge: 2004); Performing Nature: Explorations in Ecology and the Arts, ed. with Nigel Stewart (Peter Lang: 2005); The Politics of New Media Theatre (Routledge: 2007); Performing Presence: Between the Live and the Simulated, co-authored with Nick Kaye (MUP: 2011), nominated in Theatre Library Association 44th Annual Book Awards (2012); Archaeologies of Presence, co-edited with Nick Kaye and Michael Shanks (Routledge: 2012); Performing Mixed Reality, co-authored with Steve Benford (MITP: 2011) and Archive Everything (MITP, forthcoming). She has published articles in Contemporary Theatre Review, Leonardo, Performance Research, Digital Creativity, TDR and PAJ, and developed conference papers for IVA 2009, 9th International Conference on Intelligent Virtual Agents, CHI 2008, CHI 2009 (best paper award), CHI 2012 (best paper award) and CHI 2013 (best paper award). She is an investigator in the RCUK funded Horizon Digital Economy Research Hub (2009-2014) and is collaborating with Tate and RAMM on a number of projects. She has a BA from Turin University and a PhD from Cambridge University, UK.
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